What we do

What we do

Eli Lilly and Partners

Since 2003, Lilly has worked hand in hand with its partners to prevent multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) from gaining ground and taking more lives. Now funded by the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation, the Lilly MDR-TB Partnership brings together government leaders, global health organizations, country-level healthcare providers, community and advocacy organizations and other stakeholders to increase the availability of quality-assured medicine used to treat MDR-TB, enhance education for healthcare professionals where the need is greatest, and raise awareness of the disease amongst communities most at risk.

Project Background

The ICN TB/MDR-TB Project has been part of the Eli Lilly MDR-TB Partnership since 2005. The project aims to build global nursing capacity in the prevention, care and treatment of TB. This is achieved by training experienced nurses to cascade information to nursing colleagues and other health workers with the purpose of making improvements to patient care delivery. From 2005 to 2008, in Phases 1 and 2 a transformational training methodology was developed along with regularly updated training materials including an e-learning tool. The practice-oriented nature of our training programme enables nurses to improve the implementation of policies and guidelines relating to TB and MDR-TB using a patient-centred approach.

 

Global Health Advocates (GHA)

Global Health Advocates is a non-governmental organization that focuses on engaging all sections of society to fight diseases that disproportionately affect people living in poverty, and are also the leading causes of people living in poverty.

In particular, Global Health Advocates works towards the formulation and implementation of effective public policies to fight disease and ill health.

Established in 2001 as the Massive Effort Campaign, Global Health Advocates works in France and in India.

Global Health Committee (GHC)

The Global Health Committee is focused on curing tuberculosis (TB) and effectively treating AIDS among the world's poorest populations. We believe that it is a fundamental human right to receive medicines for curable or treatable diseases.

Process

The project is most effective when strong working relationships develop between the National Nurses Associations and the National TB Programme from the earliest stages, when participants and local co-trainers are being selected. A local co-trainer always participates in delivering the course alongside the lead ICN trainer to ensure that the course is locally relevant and this is usually a leading nurse from the National Programme.

International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC)

Red Cross Red Crescent volunteers are involved at all levels in the fight against TB. Living in the affected communities they are best placed to:

  • identify vulnerable groups
  • provide effective health education
  • find those in need of treatment

Additionally, our volunteers provide social care after the first phase of treatment. Activities include:

  • making sure that patients follow the treatment
  • helping patients to get enough good quality food
  • being there for patients when they have questions or need someone to talk to

These activities significantly increase the percentage of people who can be cured of TB.

National Red Cross Red Crescent Societies also communicate with national authorities, policy-makers and the public to ensure that the necessary resources are available to control TB.

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