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News

Jueves, 26 Junio 2014 20:03

Queen Naulapwa Chisanga

Queen Naulapwa Chisanga is a nurse by profession and has worked as Assistant TB/HIV/AIDS /Leprosy Coordinator at Lusaka District Community Medical Office in Zambia, since 1996. She attended the ICN Training for Transformation in prevention, care and management of TB in 2009 at Fringilla.

Nurse Chisanga has been active in training nurses and community health workers in all aspects of TB care and prevention from contact screening, to infection prevention to adherence counselling. Her services are often required as a consultant to facilitate training in districts outside her own. In the last few years treatment success rates have remained high and mortality rates and delays in diagnosis have been reduced.

Nurse Chisanga believes that without the collective efforts from the key players  e.g. Ministry of Health (National TB Programme –NTP),  International Council of Nurses, Provincial health office, District Health Office , Health Facilities , Community  members ,private Hospitals , ZUNO and stake holders  in the fight against TB/HIV /AIDS, the improvements in programme outcomes would not have been achieved.

 “May the same spirit of hard working, commitment and support towards the programme be continued. I love my work and enjoy it above all, I feel happy when my TB Patients are cured. Together we can fight TB.”

Lunes, 26 Mayo 2014 20:04

Guiying Nie

Guiying Nie is deputy director at the TB Treatment Center of Yunnan CDC in Kunming, China.

She attended the ICN Training for Transformation in prevention, care and management of TB in July 2013 in Chongqing. She aims to help patients to take the whole treatment without interruption through group psychological guidance and support, to choose effective infection control measures and reduce the MDR-TB or XDR-TB cases due to irregular treatment.

“Under the support and help of projects like ICN, CAP - TB and the global fund projects, our care team has gotten rid of the traditional and fixed form of thinking and working, no longer being limited to injection, medicine distribution and health promotion. Our working domains have been stretched; our skills have been expanded; our nursing work has been endowed with new meaning.

“ Nurses can now select and wear correctly masks, collect quality sputum samples to test, select the reasonable and regular treatment, and understand how to analyze and deal with problems. In addition, the trust and the satisfaction between nursing staff and patients have significantly improved, and there is teamwork between families, patients and other groups.

Viernes, 28 Marzo 2014 10:38

ICN recognizes Malawian Nurse, Ms Mary Kaponya

Malawi News Agency (Lilongwe)

Malawi: International Council of Nurses Recognizes Malawian Nurse

By Kondwani Chitosi, 26 March 2014

A Malawian female nurse has received international recognition for her role in the fight against Tuberculosis (TB), as the country is making great strides by significantly reducing TB cases and deaths, Malawi News Agency (Mana) has Learnt.

Executive Director for Nurses and Midwifes Council of Malawi, Harriet Kapyepe made the announcement during the commemoration of World TB day whose theme is "Reach the three million; find, treat, cure TB" held at Phirinjuzi Primary School in the area of Traditional Authority Masumbankhunda of Lilongwe.

"It is an honour to stand here and announce that a fellow nurse, Mary Kaponya who has been specializing in TB treatment as a community nurse for the past 11 years has been recognized for her great role. She has been recognized by International Council of Nurses an umbrella body for all nurses' councils for her dedication to work. She even invests her own resources into her job," said Kapyepe before asking guest of honour at the function, Deputy Minister of Health, Chikumbutso Hiwa to present an award of excellence, a certificate and a watch to Kaponya.

Jueves, 25 Abril 2013 00:00

Videomessage from Valentina Sarkisova (Russia)

Jueves, 25 Abril 2013 00:00

Gini Williams Interview (Phase 3 launch)

Jueves, 17 Marzo 2011 16:32

2011 TB Award Recipients

  Fifteen Nurses receive the 5th ICN/Lilly Award 

 for Work in Tuberculosis and Multi-drug Resistant TB

The ICN/Lilly Award for Nursing Excellence in TB/MDR-TB is one aspect of ICN’s work in TB and multi-drug resistant TB as a founding member of the Lilly MDR-TB Partnership. During this partnership, since 2005 more than 30'000 nurses and allied health workers have been trained in TB endemic countries. This annual award supported by Lilly recognizes nursing expertise and aims to motivate nurses working with those affected by TB and MDR-TB in countries included in the TB project. It showcases the contribution made by nurses to TB prevention, care and treatment and offers the recipients an educational grant to continue their professional development along with a specially designed medal. Recipients are selected by their national nurses association for their outstanding achievement in TB prevention, care and treatment.

On 24 March, on the occasion of  World TB Day, the International Council of Nurses in partnership with Eli Lilly and Company has given awards to the following fifteen nurses, from eleven countries, who through their dedication, passion and innovative care strategies, are living examples of the World TB Day slogan "On the move against tuberculosis: Transforming the fight towards elimination". 

 

Lunes, 06 Diciembre 2010 15:31

Press Releases

Risk Reduction and Inter-professional Collaboration for TB Infection Control - A practical Toolkit for those involved in TB worldwide (23 March 2012)

New tuberculosis e-course from ICN will help build global capacity ( 10 November 2010)

ICN celebrates the courage and determination of outstanding nurses who strive to offer quality care for patients with TB and MDR-TB (28 May 2010)

Press Release 19 March 2010 On the move against tuberculosis: Nurses from 11 countries awarded for outstanding achievement in TB prevention, care and treatment
Press Release 24 March 2009 Nurses from Russia, the Philippines and sub- Saharan Africa Garner Awards for Excellence in TB and Drug-resistant TB Work
Press Release November 19 2008 Lilly and International Council of Nurses Win Partnership Award from the US Chamber of Commerce Business Civic Leadership Center  [français | español]
Press Release 25 September 2008 Scaling Up the Global Nursing Workforce to Fight Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis [français | español]
Press Release 5 May 2008 Outstanding Nurses Receive ICN/Lilly Award for their Work in Tuberculosis and Multi–drug Resistant TB [ français | español]
Press Release 22 March 2007 Five Nurses Win the Newly Launched ICN/Lilly Award for Work in Tuberculosis and Multi–drug Resistant TB [russian, french and español]
Press Release 21 March 2006 Nobel Peace Laureates and representatives of 20 million health care providers call on governments to fund the scale up of human resources needed to fight TB [français | español]
ICN Press Release 31 August 2005
ICN Responds to Tuberculosis Crisis with a Capacity Building Programme for Nurses [français | español]
ICN Press Release 23 March 2005 A New Global Resource for the Nurses in Fighting TB and Multi-drug resistant TB [français | español]

World TB Day Press Releases


Lunes, 06 Diciembre 2010 14:33

UGANDA: Only one third of TB patients cured

KAMPALA, 20 March 2008 (PLUSNEWS) - Becky Mugisha* had been ill with a hacking cough for three months before she was admitted into one of Kampala's busiest tuberculosis (TB) wards, but she recognised the symptoms long before that. It was her second bout with the disease.

The last time Mugisha had had TB, about a year before, she was put on a sixth-month course of treatment. As a person living with HIV, she was used to taking multiple pills on a daily basis, but she failed to complete her treatment because the dispensing clinic where she lives in Wakiso, just east of Uganda's capital, Kampala, ran out of the drugs. Mugisha's compromised immune system and treatment history made her susceptible to infection with multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB), a strain of the disease that requires more expensive and extensive treatment and affects 4.4 percent of TB patients in Uganda who have previously been treated for the disease, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Now Mugisha is receiving inpatient treatment at the TB unit in Mulago Hospital, Kampala's main referral hospital. While many hospitals and health centres outside Kampala can treat TB, few can handle MDR-TB cases that often require long hospital stays.

Lunes, 06 Diciembre 2010 14:31

SOUTH AFRICA: Prison-like hospitals for drug-resistant TB patients

JOHANNESBURG, 25 March 2008 (PLUSNEWS) - Another hospital breakout in South Africa by drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) patients desperate to spend the holidays with their families has some public health experts questioning whether forced isolation is either the most effective or humane way to treat such patients.

On Thursday, 25 patients with multi drug-resistant (MDR) TB and eight with extensively drug-resistant(XDR) TB pushed their way past guards at Jose Pearson TB Hospital in Port Elizabeth, in the Eastern Cape. By Monday, 21 of them had returned, most of them voluntarily, four as a result of court orders.

MDR-TB is resistant to the two most powerful anti-TB drugs, while XDR-TB is resistant to these and at least two others. Whereas non-drug resistant TB is treated on an out-patient basis with a six-month course of drugs, South Africa's policy is to treat drug-resistant TB patients as in-patients until they are no longer infectious. XDR-TB patients, who are the most difficult to treat and pose the greatest public health risk, are required to spend up to two years in hospital, isolated from their families and facing the very real possibility that they will die before being released.

Lunes, 06 Diciembre 2010 14:30

KENYA: Displacement raises risk of drug-resistant TB

NAIROBI, 2 April 2008 (PLUSNEWS) -

Caption: The national referral hospital has already seen seven new cases of MDR-TB from one IDP camp in the capital, Nairobi

The threat of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has been heightened by the displacement of an estimated 300,000 people in Kenya's recent political crisis, health workers have said.

"During the violence, many displaced people were disrupted from their lives, which meant disruption from drugs," said Dr Henderson Irimu, head of the HIV/TB treatment care at the Kenyatta National Hospital, the country's largest referral hospital. "Due to the violence it was impossible for people to come for medication."

Irimu said there had been an increase in MDR-TB, a form of the disease that does not respond to standard treatment, usually because of a failure to complete first-line treatment. When patients are co-infected with HIV, it is often lethal.

"So far we have seven new cases of MDR-TB who were brought at the hospital from Mathare internally displaced settlement [in the capital, Nairobi]," he said. "Some would come and admit to not having taken TB medication since the violence began."

"Patients who were found to have developed resistance to first line medication require to be treated in isolation for a period of four months to reduce the spread, but there is a need for a special clinic or ward facility for MDR-TB," he added.

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