Redes de Enfermería Red de Teleenfermería
 

Network Membership

The ICN HIV/AIDS Network is a network of nurses working or interested in HIV policy, practice, education, management and or research. In order to join the Network you can register online by completing the Network membership form. Your application will be acknowledged.

Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 13:24
 

History of emergency nursing

Celebration of Emergency Nursing

Presentation Summary by Gary Jones, International Emergency Nursing Conference Edinburgh 2000

It could be said that in any age we can see the beginnings of emergency care and emergency nursing. But if we take on board comments made at the beginning of the 19th century when nursing was regarded as an inferior, disagreeable and repellent form of domestic service, it is perhaps wise not to go too far back for our roots.

In the 1800's as hospitals become more popular so emergency care grew and many people would sit for hours waiting for treatment. Unless you were dying, and even then you may have to wait, the general rule of thumb was first come first served. This situation was intolerable and hence one of our major emergency care advancements and one we should celebrate came about - triage.

Triage while having been used in war for centuries had not been established in the emergency department. The first reference to triage during non-disaster activity was in 1963 at Yale, Newhaven hospital USA. However if we look further back to a lecture given by Sir D'Arcy Power in Glasgow in 1898 describing the casualty department at St Bartholomews hospital London we find that at 8.30am patients began to assemble on the steps but were not allowed in until the last stroke of nine.

The doors were then opened to allow one patient at a time to enter and the nurse asked the patient what was the complaint and then referred the person to either the physician or surgeon as was thought fit. The diagnosis was rough and unskilled but usually correct. While triage was not immediately recognised as a nursing role it is now firmly the nurse's remit and continues to be developed.

While emergency nursing has grown over the centuries the last 35 years have seen the most profound changes especially in the position that emergency nurses now hold. Perhaps that persistence comes from the founder of modern nursing. Florence Nightingale's role in the Crimea certainly puts her into the category of an emergency nurse and the establishment of a nurse training school in London in 1860 started the development of modern nursing as we know it today.

One of the key success stories of emergency nursing and another major celebration milestone has to be the emergence of emergency nursing groups. Since the early seventies many countries have developed national organisations, spreading the word and professionalism of emergency nurses.

When we look through our history we find numerous areas that we can truly celebrate, the development of resuscitation standards, care of rape victims, campaigning for health care legislation, pre hospital care, care of children, the elderly and psychiatric care in emergency departments all areas to be proud of.

A tremendous amount of work has been undertaken in the care of suddenly bereaved relatives. Many nurses have developed standards for this aspect of our work. Many follow up the relatives with telephone calls and on going short term support.

Trauma care is another area that I wish to focus on. Care in the past was not as organised as it is now. It was a bit of a free for all and certainly required attention.

The Trauma Nursing Core Course is truly an international course. While having its roots and base in the US, the international faculty makes it a true world-wide course that provides standards internationally for trauma nursing. TNCC is now in a number of countries across the Globe.

Emergency Nurse Practitioners: During the last 20 years nurses have constantly pushed forward the boundaries and have developed emergency nursing not only to improve patient care but also to reduce waiting time. The Emergency Nurse Practitioners in the emergency department and minor injuries units have achieved this new role and now many patients are treated and discharged having seen the best person for their problem - the emergency nurse.

The International Conference: The first ever international emergency nursing conference was held in 1985 in London. That first conference found many emergency nurses from all over the world coming together for the first time. In fact there were over 600 delegates representing 28 different countries.

Reflecting on our international links also reminds us not to forget but rather celebrate the large numbers of emergency nurses who work across national boundaries helping fellow emergency nurses in other countries. Many emergency nurses work for international organisations and so professionally give their all to deal with disasters in all its guises. Many thanks from us all.

So what has happened in the 1990's? Well a tremendous amount and this can be seen in the developments of key areas that were established in the 1970's and 80's. Development of triage, care of bereaved relatives, child care, psychiatric care, pre hospital care and many more. What for me the nineties have done is polished the groundwork that was started.

Education and research has taken all the work forward in leaps and bounds. No longer is it acceptable to assume things work. It must be proven through research and then be available to all through a proper educational program.

Another key success of the nineties has to be the way nurses, doctors and therapists are more relaxed and working in a much more collaborative way, the co-operation and multi-disciplinary working has almost replaced the hostility and territorial boundaries of the 1970's and 80's.

So let us all continue to celebrate emergency nursing because emergency nursing is simply the best.

Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 12:58
 

Redes de Enfermería

Anteriormente, el CIE proporcionaba oportunidades para que las enfermeras pudiesen reunirse de manera informal en sus reuniones. Sin embargo, considerando que el mundo es cada vez más complejo y está cambiando rápidamente, otras maneras inmediatas son necesarias para comunicar y proseguir con intereses profesionales en común.

Con esta finalidad, el CIE ha elegido un mecanismo basado en redes ya que las mismas

  • Permiten conocer a personas fuera del círculo inmediato de contactos;
  • Establecen y utilizan contactos para información, apoyo y otra asistencia
  • Crean relaciones y, sobretodo, redes
  • Comunican.

Las redes pueden ir más allá de los límites organizativos, profesionales, disciplinarios y nacionales.

El CIE ha identificado algunas actividades para sus redes. Estas pueden:

  • Identificar problemas en forma temprana y controlar cómo se desarrollan;
  • Seguir tendencias;
  • Ofrecer experticia especial a través de la creación de un fondo de recursos de los miembros de la red;
  • Difundir el trabajo del CIE y de otros en el área de interés y organizar reuniones y conferencias.

 

Última actualización el Martes 08 de Febrero de 2011 09:35
 

About Emergency Care Network

International Declaration of Co-operation & Friendship

People all over the world benefit from the expert care of nurses in emergency settings.

During the last part of the twentieth century emergency nurses worldwide have been coming together to share their experiences, ideas and hopes for the future.

Emergency nurses are already succeeding in improving the care they give to patients by reaching international agreement on specialist education and training in this important field of nursing.

As we enter the twenty-first century, let us take the opportunity to join together and affirm that we share the following principles, in a spirit of partnership and mutual respect.

  • To promote the value of emergency nursing worldwide, to the family of nursing, fellow health workers and the communities we serve.
  • To promote the science and art of emergency nursing worldwide.
  • To promote co-operation and friendship among emergency nurses worldwide.
  • And to do this through every channel available, including local, national and international nursing organisations, traditional and new forms of communication and decision-making bodies everywhere.

This declaration was signed by emergency nurses from 19 countries, at the International Emergency Nursing Conference, 17 August 2000.

International Co-operation & Friendship

What is it?

The International Co-operation & Friendship provides a way for all emergency nurses to participate in an international partnership arrangement through the International Council of Nurses.

What is the purpose of this web site section?

Create a vehicle that allows exchange at the international level for nurses and others providing emergency care and working on associated clinical, labour, management, ethical and social issues .

The future?

The success of the web page depends heavily on its use. If the web page is visited by emergency nurses regularly then additional services such as message boards and chat rooms can be developed. The really exciting aspect of this iniative is that every emergency nurse with access to the web will be part of and have easier access to the international emergency nursing family.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 10:44
 

Network Launch

The ICN Telenursing Network launch on 1 July 2009 at the ICN Congress in Durban South Africa was attended by over 60 enthusiastic people. Franz Wagner, 1st Vice President of ICN, welcomed the group in the name of ICN President Hiroko Minami. Claudia Bartz, ICN staff, talked briefly about ICN services to networks and ICN network obligations. She announced to the audience the names of the 12 members of the Telenursing Network Advisory Group and described in general terms some of the network aims and activities. Four members of the Advisory Group then described their work and also talked about their ideas for the continued advancement of telenursing in the context of eHealth. The speakers, who truly represented the world, were Jennifer Chipps, South Africa; Isabel Amelia Costa Mendes, Brazil; Shane Kruger, Australia; and Angela Single, United Kingdom. A fifth member of the Advisory Group, Thomas Kwok Shing Wong, was also at the session. The final speaker, Frank Lievens, International Coordinator of Med-e-Tel and also Secretary and Treasurer of the International Society for Telemedicine & eHealth, encouraged the audience to be full partners in the advancement of telenursing and eHealth. Then followed a question and answer session with good discussion about regulatory issues (e.g., licensure, malpractice, and data ownership), and care delivery sites (e.g., from islands to cities). Ideas for the network included a newsletter, a bulletin board for questions and answers, translation of information, sharing of good practices, sharing teaching material, a speakers bureau, and collaborative projects with eHealth organizations.
Última actualización el Miércoles 11 de Agosto de 2010 08:31
 

Resources and Related Publications

NEW Resources for Disasters

Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) advocacy paper on humanitarian assistance and older persons | (IASC) French version
Health Cluster Guide
Disaster Nursing References - March 2009
HEALTH AND NUTRITION TRACKING SERVICE (HNTS) PEER REVIEW REPORT Re-examining mortality from the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo, 1998-2006
HEALTH AND NUTRITION TRACKING SERVICE (HNTS) Review of Publicly Available Surveys, North Kivu, DRC, 2006-2008
Health issues and treatment guidelines in disaster relief - SATELLIFE
WHO Disasters

C

Canadian Nurses Foundation. Resources
http://www.cna-aiic.ca/CNA/resources/other/default_e.aspx

Cochrane reviews NEW
Special summaries of reviews on interventions relevant to infectious diseases, injuries and wounds, rebuilding of communities and infrastructures, mental health, nutrition, rehabilitation and pregnancy and childbirth are available free of charge at ( www.EvidenceAid.org )

Community Emergency Preparedness: a manual for managers and policy-makers, World Health Organization, Geneva 1999.
Further information on this and other WHO publications can be obtained from
Marketing and Dissemination, World Health Organization, 1211 Geneva 27,
Switzerland and website:http://www.who.org

D

Disaster Nursing References - March 2009 NEW

E

Emergency and Humanitarian Action (WHO Newsletter)
http://www.who.int/disasters/

Emergency Preparedness & Response Training Catalogue
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/eprtc-cfmiu/index.html

H

HEALTH AND NUTRITION TRACKING SERVICE (HNTS) PEER REVIEW REPORT NEW
Re-examining mortality from the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo, 1998-2006
http://www.icn.ch/HNTS_peer_review.pdf
HEALTH AND NUTRITION TRACKING SERVICE (HNTS) NEW
Review of Publicly Available Surveys, North Kivu, DRC, 2006-2008
http://www.icn.ch/HNTS_review.pdf
Health Cluster Guide NEW
http://www.who.int/hac/network/global_health_cluster/guide/en/
Health issues and treatment guidelines in disaster relief - SATELLIFE

http://www.healthnet.org/disasterhealthpaper.php

I

Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) advocacy paper on humanitarian assistance and older persons |
(IASC) French version NEW

ICN Code of Ethics
http://www.icn.ch/ethics.htm

ICN Position Statement on Armed Conflict
http://www.icn.ch/psarmed.htm

ICN Position Statement on Disaster Preparedness
Adopted in 2001
http://www.icn.ch/psdisasterprep01.htm

ICN Position Statement on the Elimination of Weapons of War and Conflict
http://www.icn.ch/pswar.htm

ICN Position Statement on the Health Services for Migrants, Refugees and Displaced Persons
http://www.icn.ch/psmigrants00.htm

ICN Position Statement on Nurses and Human Rights
http://www.icn.ch/pshumrights.htm

M

Mental Health Services in Disasters: Manual for Humanitarian Workers, Raquel E. Cohen, 2000, 176 pp., ISBN 92 75 122741, US$ 18.00, available also in Spanish

Mental Health Services in Disasters: Instructor's Guide, Raquel E. Cohen, 2000, 96 pp. ISBN 92 75 122733, US$ 18.00, available also in Spanish

N

Natural Disaster Mitigation in Drinking Water and Sewerage Systems: Guidelines for Vulnerability Analysis, Raquel E. Cohen, 1998, 96 pp., ISBN 92 75 12250 4, US$ 22.00, available also in Spanish.

National Center for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
http://www.ncptsd.org/facts/disasters/fs_survivors_disaster.html

Nursing Insight
http://wadem.medicine.wisc.edu/nursinginsight.htm
Review of disaster healthcare literature for nurses
Published by the Nursing Section of the WADEM

R

Rapid Needs Assessment in Federal Disaster Operations
Operations Manual
Federal Emergency Management Manual
April 2001
http://www.fema.gov/library/rnaops1.pdf
[ 346 KB]

Reactions and Guidelines for Children Following Trauma/Disaster
http://www.icn.ch/disas_child.pdf

Dr Iyad Zaqout-Coordinator of CI Project
Gaza Community Mental Health Programme

T

The ICN Code of Ethics for Nurses
http://www.icn.ch/ethics.htm

The Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response - available on the website
http://www.sphereproject.org/handbook_index.htm.

The Management of Nutrition in Major Emergencies, World Health Organization, Geneva 2000.
Further information on this and other WHO publications can be obtained from

Marketing and Dissemination, World Health Organization, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland and website: http://www.who.org

W

WHO NEW has developed an Integrated Management on Emergency and Essential Surgical Care (IMEESC) toolkit, based on the WHO manual 'Surgical Care at the District Hospital www.who.int/surgery. This tool targets policy-makers and health-care providers and provides guidance on WHO recommendations for minimum standards on emergency and essential surgical care in trauma, obstetrics and anaesthesia at first-referral level health-care facilities.

WHO Disasters
http://www.who.int/topics/disasters/en/

WHO Emergency and Humanitarian Action
http://www.who.int/disasters

WHO- Emergency and Humanitarian Action
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs090/en/

WHO Emergency Preparedness and Response Highlights

Emergency Preparedness and Response Highlights August 2003 [pdf file]
Emergency Preparedness and Response Highlights April 2003 [pdf file]
Emergency Preparedness and Response Highlights Issue 2/2003 (February) [pdf file, 52 KB]
Emergency Preparedness and Response Highlights Issue 1/2003 (January) [pdf file, 54 KB]
Newsletter - v. 1, n. 11, December 2002 [475 KB]

Newsletter - v. 1, n. 10, November 2002 [349 KB]

Newsletter - v. 1, n. 8, September 2002 [324 KB]

WHO - Fact Sheet on Emergency and Humanitarian Care
EMERGENCY AND HUMANITARIAN ACTION
Fact Sheet N° 90
Revised August 2001
http://www.who.int/inf-fs/en/fact090.html

WHO - Health Action in Crisis
http://www.who.int/hac/donorinfo/cap/cap2006/en/index.html

WHO - Health in Emergencies - Newsletter
http://www.who.int/hac/network/newsletter/en/

WHO - Mental Health in Emergencies
http://www.who.int/mental_health/prevention/mnhemergencies/en/

WHO - Mental Health in Emergencies
http://www.who.int/mental_health/media/en/640.pdf

WHO - Situation reports NEW
http://www.who.int/hac/crises/idn/sitreps/en/

WHO- TSUNAMIS - Technical Hazard Sheet - Natural Disaster Profile
http://www.who.int/hac/techguidance/ems/tsunamis/en/

Última actualización el Lunes 26 de Julio de 2010 14:00
   

Red de Preparación para casos de catástrofes

No hay traducciones disponibles.

The goal of this page is to provide useful information and resources for those interested in joining disaster relief efforts or improving relevant skills. We hope this communication tool will highlight the significant contributions of individual nurses and other persons of various disciplines involved in disaster relief.

Última actualización el Lunes 23 de Junio de 2014 10:16
   

Leadership For Change Network

The Leadership For Change (LFC )™ Network was launched during the 2003 Geneva Conference. Membership in this network is available to individuals who have participated in an International Council of Nurses’ (ICN) LFC ™ programme or a LFC ™ programme provided by an ICN certified Trainer. LFC ™ programme mentors, advisory board members, sponsors and Provider Organisations are also welcome to join the LFC ™ Network.

Why a LFC ™ Network?

Over 500 LFC ™ participants, mentors, advisory board members, provider organisations and funders have participated in the LFC ™ programme in more than 50 countries. ICN is committed to supporting LFC ™ participants as leaders and managers. The LFC ™ Network is a key vehicle to deliver the support.

What will the LFC ™ Network do?

  • Provide a forum for LFC ™ participants and key partners to share strategies and successes regarding leadership and the LFC ™ programme;
  • Provide a LFC ™ Network web page with information on leadership and management that will help enrich LFC ™ Network members’ growth and development as leaders;
  • Have a regular Leadership For Change ™ column in the LFC ™ Bulletin.
Última actualización el Viernes 22 de Octubre de 2010 07:41
     

Regulation Network

Regulation has been a key priority for ICN for many years and ICN has built up considerable expertise in this area. Whereas ICN previously relied on workshops, informal meetings and special conference sessions to help nurses develop effective regulation of nursing worldwide, this network will be a permanent continually updated mechanism and a resource. ICN's inaugural network meeting took place in Vancouver in June 1997, and meets at al of ICN’s Conferences and Congresses. The bi-annual Regulation Bulletin is sent network members electronically and posted on the ICN website.


Última actualización el Viernes 22 de Octubre de 2010 07:36
 

Research Network

The International Council of Nurses (ICN) promotes nursing research in order to advance nursing knowledge and to improve the quality of nursing practice. As one approach to advance nursing knowledge and better standards of care, ICN is creating a Research Network.

Última actualización el Viernes 22 de Octubre de 2010 07:35
 

Rural and Remote Nursing Network

The ICN Rural and Remote Nursing Network aims to connect, educate, support and collaborate with nurses from across the globe who have an interest in rural and remote nursing, with the goal of improving the timeliness, quality and access of a broad range of health care services and nursing practice for individuals, their families, communities and countries.

The principal goal of the ICN Rural and Remote Nursing Network is to serve as a global resource for nurses working or interested in rural and remote nursing practice. By promoting effective networking and linkages, the Network enables the sharing of nursing knowledge and expertise and stimulates reflection on the changing nature of nursing care delivery systems across the globe specifically for people living in rural and remote areas. The Network will also serve as a resource for rural and remote nurses in the areas of technology development, policy, standards, education and research.

Última actualización el Martes 04 de Junio de 2013 13:02
 

Red de Teleenfermería

No hay traducciones disponibles.


Última actualización el Jueves 25 de Abril de 2013 19:28
 

About Nursing Education Network

With the new international realities of migration, advances in communication technology, and a worldwide nursing shortage, educating and preparing a diverse nursing workforce has become a critical priority. To address this, the International Council of Nurses has established the ICN Nursing Education Network (ICNEN) in order to provide a forum to address nursing education issues worldwide.

Currently, this website features the ICNEN Forum, the Network application form, and other relevant content. As we go forward the website will be updated with input from members, new publications, reports and expert comment. The website will serve as a primary communication tool, providing updates and new information and addressing issues that members prioritize and nurse educators find significant. We thank you for your interest in the ICN Education Network and look forward to hearing from you!

Última actualización el Miércoles 09 de Marzo de 2011 14:54
 

Education Network Mission

The Mission of the ICN Education Network is to provide a global forum for nurse educators and others interested in nursing education. The ICNEN aims to address the:

  • role of nurse educators worldwide
  • quality of nursing education
  • opportunities and challenges of nursing education and clinical practice
  • international nursing and nursing faculty shortages
Última actualización el Viernes 04 de Noviembre de 2011 16:01
 

Membership

Membership is growing rapidly and is open to all individuals who are nurse educators or interested in nursing education.
If you would like to join ICNEN or if you have any recommendations about how ICNEN can better serve its members, please complete the ICNEN application form or feel free to contact us.

Última actualización el Miércoles 25 de Agosto de 2010 09:34
 

The Launch

ICNEN was officially launched in Durban, South Africa during the ICN 24th Quadrennial Congress 2009 by the then ICN President, Hiroko Minami.

“The ICN Education Network is a significant step forward in addressing nursing education and putting it on the global health agenda,” stated Dr. Minami. “We need the voice of educators as we deal with the challenges of regulation and practice and we are very happy that the NLN has put this forward.”

ICN member national nurses associations (NNAs) that wrote letters of support for the ICNEN were asked to suggest an individual to join the Network’s inaugural Steering Committee and contribute to the initial development phase.. The Steering Committee is expected to draft the governance structure of ICNEN, initiate the formal development of the Network, and prioritize topics for ICNEN members to explore during the biennium. Members represent Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, Latin America, and North America.


Última actualización el Martes 27 de Julio de 2010 16:57
 

Steering Committee members

Virginia W. Adams
Virginia W. Adams, Chair, United States of America

Jane Mills
Jane Mills, Australia

Anne-Marie Kanerva
Anne-Marie Kanerva, Finland

Sharon Vasuthevan
Sharon Vasuthevan, South Africa

Lian-Hua Huang
Lian-Hua Huang, Taiwan

Kathleen McCourt
Kathleen McCourt, United Kingdom

Jean Barry
ICN Representative (ex-officio)
Jean Barry, Nursing and Health Policy Consultant

During the launch meeting, the Steering Committee members introduced an environmental scan to highlight the priority challenges in nursing education in their region. The participants responded to the scans, affirmed the priorities, and noted additional challenges.

Última actualización el Jueves 10 de Julio de 2014 01:00
 

Conferences

3rd NETNEP International Nurse Education Conference, Sydney, Australia in April 2010

In 2006 the first NETNEP International Nurse Education Conference was launched in Vancouver, Canada. A second conference was held in June 2008 in Dublin, Ireland and the third in the series was hosted in Sydney, Australia in April 2010. Full details of the first two conferences as well as details of the third conference can be found at
http://www.netnep-conference.elsevier.com/

In 2008 over 600 abstracts were received for the conference and delegates attended from 32 countries. Due to this response, the 2010 conference has been extended to three days and included three interactive parallel poster sessions in the programme.

There was also a student programme at the conferences and the organizers were pleased to be able to offer up to 5 free places in Sydney to eligible students (including full registration and assistance with travel costs and expenses).

The themes for the conference were Interprofessional education; Education in clinical practice; Technology in health and social care education; History, policy and theory in education; Research methodology in nursing education; Teaching and assessment in practice.

Última actualización el Miércoles 28 de Julio de 2010 08:35
 

Network Meeting 2011

ICN Malta Conference – May 2011

Providing Access: Recruiting and Retaining Nurses in Rural and Remote Areas
This was the theme of a presentation delivered by Jean-Marc Braichet of the World Health Organization (WHO). The presentation was in light of the then recently released WHO document regarding research based guidelines related to the retention of health workers in rural and remote regions.

Portuguese islands of Azores: a special kind of remote nursing
Professor Lucilia Nunes' presentation reinforced that the members of the ICN Rural and Remote Nurses Network have experiences that can offer insight into how to provide access to quality health care for the world's rural and remote populations.

Both of these presentations at the ICN Malta Conference demonstrated that the ICN Rural and Remote Nurses Network is very keen to engage with the wider international nursing community to develop the science of rural nursing in the global context and inform policy developments that increase access to services.

rural1 

Jean-Marc Braichet, World Health Organization and Lucilia Nunes, at the 2011 ICN RRNN meeting, ICN Malta Conference

rural2 

Marianne Baernholdt, Jean-Marc Braichet, Jean Barry, Professor Lucilia Nunes and Debra Cerasa at the ICN RRNN meeting

Última actualización el Miércoles 21 de Agosto de 2013 01:00
 

Conference Reports

Nurses at the Forefront of HIV/AIDS
Report : International Nurses' Forum
August 2006 Toronto, Canada

 

Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 10:28
 

History of the Accident and Emergency Nursing Association in UK

On the water's edge of Salford Quays, England lies a stone with the words "From the labour of yesterday lives the spirit of tomorrow". This verse is very apt for our association because throughout its 30 year history hundreds of A & E nurses have shaped its activities and that spirit continues today.

The words are also very appropriate for emergency care. Our speciality is young compared with other areas of medicine and nursing. In fact the whole speciality of emergency care only emerged in the 1960's. Prior to that orthopaedic surgeons had run "casualty departments".

During the first couple of years of the 1970's a small group of dedicated A & E nurses, no more than about 60, came together to start the first moves towards an A & E group within the RCN.

The main supporter and enthusiast for this group was Margaret Lee, the nurse advisor at the RCN.

This work paid off and in 1972, the RCN A & E nursing group was established. This was a great step forward for A & E nurses especially as the speciality was so new.

The first chair of the group was Betty Hoy 1972- 1974.

Betty was nurse manager of the A & E department at the Brook Hospital Greenwich. During these early years meetings were held throughout England and local groups were established. One of the main functions of the group was the provision of clinical updating and education for A & E nurses. Remember in the early 1970's there was no A & E courses

In fact this was one of the first major tasks of the group - to set up a joint board of clinical nursing studies course. This was successful and was the for-runner of the current ENB 199.

1974-1976 the group was chaired by Susan Moore.

All the activist continued to push forward A & E nursing in a speciality that was still medically dominated. Many departments were still run by orthopaedic surgeons.

In 1976 Kate O'Hanlon took the helm for a period of seven year

Kate was the senior sister of the A & E department of the Royal Victoria Hospital Belfast. During this period, in 1978, the group became a forum within the newly established RCN Association of Nursing Practice.

In 1979 the first annual meeting was held and it is interesting that so many of the subjects discussed are still with us today - violence and the extended role of the nurse was two such subjects.

At the 1980 annual meeting, closure of A & E departments and collecting prescription charges were hot issue

Significant events during the years 1976 - 1983 includes

  • Joint working with the Casualty Surgeons Association (now the British Association for A & E Medicine)
  • Work to push for seat belt legislation, which as we know was successful. This type of activity also shows how A & E nursing is not just about treating the sick and injured but also about how to help the community prevent injuries.
  • The first joint Casualty Surgeons and RCN A & E nursing forum conference was held in Ireland
  • One of the key partnerships that until very recently existed - the start of the 3M Health Care/RCN A & E awards. Particular thanks need to go to Peter Radcliffe who was until his retirement the Public Relations manager for 3M Health Care and the key player in establishing the awards.
  • And if all that was not enough, the first Emergency Nurse newsletter was born in 1983

Between 1983 - 1985 the A & E Forum was chaired by Jill Milnthorpe

Jill was nurse manager A & E Milton Keynes. Local groups were growing with 11 established by the end of 1983. Topics discussed at conferences and study days included solvent abuse, ambulance paramedic training, staffing levels, the role of nursing auxiliaries and clerical duties undertaken by nurses. The Norfolk & Norwich infusion box was launched (the forerunner to the current level 1 pressure infusor)

In 1984 because of the continued increase in violence, the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board was set up. We also started seeing the increase in new patient attendances. In 1984 it rose by 2.6% to 10.2 million.

In 1985 dealing with body fluids was never going to be quite the same again. HIV had arrived. We also started seeing territorial issues coming to the fore as both ambulance personnel and nurses flexed their individual muscles. The paramedic and extended role of the nurse debates were coming thick and furious.

The first ever A & E International Conference was organised by a group of forum members and held in London in May 1985. Never before had so many A & E nurses come together. Over 600 delegates attended from 28 different countries.

At the AGM of the international conference a new executive was elected with Peter Blythin elected as chair.

Peter Blythin chaired the forum from 1985 - 1987.

During this two-year period the forum continued to grow. Sixteen local groups had been established by the end of 1987. Significant activities included

  • During 1986 we welcomed the debate on the care of children in A & E
  • The A & E forum put together a new A & E course which had an extensive curriculum and was based around the nurse working from a basic to advanced level of competency (sound familiar). Unfortunately in 1988 the ENB stopped us in our tracks. Still we knew it would only be a matter of time before we tried again.
  • 1986 was also the year A & E nursing became well known throughout the whole of the UK; Casualty hit our television screens.
  • Other important developments in 1987 included a greater awareness of the needs of the suddenly bereaved, Bob Wright & Lisa Hadfield were becoming well known names in this sub speciality of A & E care.
  • Triage and nurse practitioners were high on the agenda. Many A & E departments started using triage in a formal way, again this major initiative came from nurses.
  • The Emergency Nurse newsletter took on a more professional appearance, thanks to the support of Smith & Nephew.

1986 saw a major change in the way the annual conference was organised and in 1987 the first A & E conference was held at The Lord Daresbury hotel.

In 1987 I (Gary Jones) was elected chair of the forum and was privileged and honoured to hold this post until 1995.

  • 1987 saw the introduction of mega codes and UK guidelines for the treatment of cardiac arrest. The forum continued to be very active at RCN congress.
  • The last few months of 1988 and the early part of 1989 again saw the A & E service well publicised. This period saw some of the most horrific major incidents of our time. In the space of a few months we had Kings Cross, Clapham, Lockerbie and Kegworth.

During my term of office a number of changes occurred

  • In 1990 the trauma pioneers hit Chicago and returned with the Trauma Nursing Core Course and within just 3 weeks the first course was held in the UK.
  • By 1990 we had 23 local groups and to keep things moving, three special interest groups were formed and A & E monitor was published.
  • 1990 The forum became an Association,
  • 1992/93 Emergency Nurse became a journal with Brian Dolan as editor. A separate newsletter continues to be published.

On December 27th 1991 the A & E nursing world was shattered by the sudden and untimely death of Ethel Buckles. Ethel the senior A & E sister at Preston had been one of those early pioneers back in 1972 and was the main force behind the conference coming to the Daresbury and TNCC coming over from the USA.

1992 saw the publication of the patient's charter and all that it brought to A & E. We also celebrated Ethel's life with the first Ethel Buckles Memorial Lecture. Bareness Caroline Cox who was the Deputy Speaker in the House of Lords and a nurse gave that first lecture.

1994 saw the publication of Challenging the Boundaries. Challenging the Boundaries was one of the handful of major events in our 25-year history and this document continues to form the blueprint for future work.

Another significant event during my term of office was the 75th anniversary of the RCN. The A & E Association had a new leaflet published and this lead to yet more members joining the association

1995 saw Rob Crouch take the chair.

Rob steered the association through the two years 1995 - 1997. During those two years we again saw major changes to the annual conference, joint working between the A & E association and BAEM resulting in the publication of the Manchester (national) triage scale. A & E association members were also involved in a number of Department of Health working groups, again demonstrating how influential the association has become.

  • One of the most important events since the Association (A & E group as it was called in the early 1970's) was established has to be the move to the establishment of the Faculty of Emergency Nursing. Although just in the discussion stage in 1997 this has continued to be one of the most radical yet most important events since the A & E group joined the RCN.

1997 Karen Castille becomes chair of the association.

During Karen's term of office the faculty under the RCN Council's steering group moved forward in leaps and bounds. In 1998 a 2-year feasibility study was financed through RCN Council. Nurses across the UK have been involved in its establishment and it certainly belongs to all A & E nurses.

Because of a change in Government we saw major changes in the way the NHS was to function. At the same time the NHS celebrated 50 years (1948 -1998).

Kathy Butcher Nurse Manager at Addenbrooks Hospital Cambridge retired from her editorship of Emergency Nurse News. Kathy one of the association's key players had edited the newsletter since 1991.

Although trolley waits had increased over many years the real "winter crisis" was being recognised at National level. Both the RCN and Government were attempting to tackle the growing crisis in our A & E departments.

Violence had been a major agenda item for the association for many years. One of our key players was Una Bell Director of A & E Services at Whipps Cross Hospital London. Unfortunately despite Una's knowledge and skills in tackling violence she herself became a victim when she was held hostage in her office by a woman who tied her up and threatened to set her alight. Fortunately due to Una's ability to deal with such a crisis and the staff's quick thinking the incident was concluded without any physical injury. Ironically the judge gave a 2 year suspended sentence.

1998 saw lots of activity on the IT front. Both NHS Direct and RCN Direct were launched.

Liz Hewitt formally a treasurer of the association and chair of the A & E group in the Midlands was appointed RCN Welsh Board Secretary.

The 2nd edition of Children in A & E was published and £30 million was earmarked for A & E modernisation.

Una Bell was awarded a RCN/Nursing Standard Lifetimes Achievement Award

1999 Linda Holt becomes the ninth chair of the Association

Linda took over the chair from Karen due to her move to the Department of Health. Karen was the second A & E chair to advise at department level. In 1994 - 1997 I had held the position of Honorary Consultant Adviser in Accident & Emergency Nursing to the Chief Nursing Officer.

The association continued to produce a number of position statements on issues such as health care assistants and care of the elderly in A & E.

The Paddington rail crash demonstrated how adaptable A & E nurses are with Sarah Caine Staff Nurse at St Mary's Paddington using her initiative when faced with a supermarket full of injured commuters. She used post-it notes as triage labels.

Within the RCN Fields of Practice were established. This brought the association working with other forums and a direct link into Council with a named council member as part of the advisory panel.

So to last year. 2000 was again very busy. The association worked closely with the CHC's and the RCN Council on pressures in A & E. This work continues. Linda Holt has been involved in top level meetings both at RCN and Government level over A & E trolley waits.

Elizabeth Yates Nurse Manager at Preston was awarded the Nursing Standard Millennium Medical Nursing Award for her work with victims of domestic violence.

The faculty project announced the five pilot sites.

A & E attendance's in England rose by 2.4% to 14.6 million.

In August the International Emergency Nursing Conference was held in Edinburgh. Like the first international conference back in 1985 it drew nurses from all over the world. Nurses representing 19 countries signed a declaration of co-operation and friendship. This declaration has led to the International Committee for Nurses (ICN) offering to support a webpage for emergency nurses and a 2-hour workshop slot at ICN Congress this year (2001).

In closing this review I must pay tribute to all the activists within the association. Although I have used the chairs periods of office to give a structure to this paper, the chairs are only as good as the other honorary officers, and they are only as good as all the members of the association. People like Gabby Lomas who has for many years been the organiser of our conferences, Brian Dolan who so successfully edits Emergency Nurse and the numerous people that have taken forward the work of the Faculty, all really committed nurses to A & E

Gary J Jones
Chair 1987-1995

Summary of Key Events

  • 1972 A & E Group established in the RCN
  • 1972-1974 A & E Course developed
  • 1978 The group becomes a Forum within the RCN
  • 1979 1st A & E Forum conference
  • 1983 Emergency Nurse Newsletter launched
  • 1985 1st International Emergency Nursing Conference, London, England
  • 1986 Forum proposes new A & E Course
  • 1987 Annual conferences start at the Lord Daresbury Hotel
  • 1990 The Forum becomes an Association
  • 1992/93 Emergency Nurse Journal launched
  • 1994 Challenging the Boundaries published
  • 1997 The Faculty of Emergency Nursing starts its journey
  • 1998 The Faculty starts its 2 year feasibility study
  • 1990 Fields of Practice start operating within the RCN
  • 2000 Faculty pilot sites announced
  • 2000 International Conference in Edinburgh, Scotland. Declaration of Co-operation & Friendship signed by 19 Countries.

 

Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 12:52
 

Brief overview of Accident and Emergency Nursing in Hong Kong

emergencycarenetwork_triagehk

Hong Kong is the smallest city in China, with 1,100 Km square, 6.8 million in population.

15 units of Accident & Emergency (A&E) in various hospitals under the governance of Hospital Authority, publicly owned; 2.3 million total attendance in 1998

A&E service is free of charge. A&E nursing history is short (1947-present); total A&E nurses: about 700

Milestones:

First A&E unit (formerly called Casualty) was in Queen Mary Hospital (1947). Latest one is in Tseung Kwan O Hospital (2000).

Nurses started to learn ENB199 in UK, in mid 1980s'. 1 to 3 nurses a year. First locally designed A&E nursing certification course was in 1994. First nurse gained CEN, USA in 1998. First TNCC provider study at USA (1995). TNCC instructor training started in Hong Kong in 2000.

Hong Kong Society of emergency medicine & surgery formed in 1985, nurses to join the society as affiliated members only. We have no organisation specifically established for A&E nurses.

Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 12:56
 

Contacts

Country

Contact

Belgium Door LAUWAERT
Vice president V.V.V.S.
Laarbeeklaan 101
1090 Brussels
Belgium
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Hong Kong Ping Fat LAU
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Italy Michele Angilletta Italy
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Netherlands Piet Machielse
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New Zealand Angela Hailes
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Jane Lawless
Chairperson, College of Emergency Nurses
New Zealand
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Philippines Eugene Felizardo. Philippines
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Singapore Josephine Teo Singapore
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Sweden Björn-Ove Suserud, RN, PhD, researcher
Director of Science, Pre-hospital Research Centre, Högskolan i Boras, School of Health Sciences.
Teacher in disaster nursing, pre-hospital nursing and
theory of science and research. Special interest is
developing the role of nurses in pre-hospital
emergency care and disaster nursing.
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Switzerland Dr Agnès Callamard
Co-Director
Humanitarian Accountability Project
Centre John Knox
27, ch des Crêts-de-Pregny
CH-1218 Grand-Saconnex
Geneva, Switzerland
Tel: 41 22 747 00 89
Fax 41 22 747 00 99
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www.hapgeneva.org


Ms Nan Buzard
Project Manager
The Sphere Project
PO box 372
1211 Geneva 19
Switzerland
tel: 41 22 730 45 01
fax: 41 22 730 49 05
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http://www.sphereproject.org

Taiwan Yiing-Yiing Sang
Head Nurse, Emergency Department of Veterans General Hospital, Taipei.

United Kingdom Brian Dolan
Emergency Nurse Editor
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Gary Jones
RCN Council member and former Chair of the RCN
Accident & Emergency Nursing Association (Forum). Provides emergency care consultancy, lectures and
expert witness services.
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Judith Morgan
Newsletter Editor, RCN Accident and Emergency
Nursing Association
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Linda Holt
Chair, RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
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Robert Sowney
Vice-Chair, RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
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United States Benny Marett
Emergency Nurses Association
President 2000
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Mary Jagim
Emergency Nurses Association
President 2001
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Sherri Almeida
Emergency Nurses Association
President 2002
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Última actualización el Lunes 18 de Octubre de 2010 14:07
 

Structure

  • Core Steering Group
  • Sub Groups will be develop as needed at the direction of the Core Steering Group as the Student Network expands to meet its objectives
Última actualización el Viernes 01 de Octubre de 2010 09:37
 

Network Decisions

The Network decision-making process is focused within the Core Steering Group and operates within the context of ICN policies and official positions on nursing and health. The points below detail the process more precisely.

  • Decisions on general matters are taken by consensus in the Core Steering Group.
  • Only Core Steering Group members may vote on network matters.
  • Each group establishes a quorum annually.
  • Attendance at meetings is by Core Steering Group members. Interested observers are welcome.
  • Documents developed by the Core Steering Group members needing ICN approval are circulated to ICN staff for review and processing.
Última actualización el Jueves 19 de Agosto de 2010 14:22
   

Membership Criteria for Core Steering Group

  • Be a current be a full student member of the ICN Student Network when term begins;
  • Able to attend international meetings;
  • Able to mentor future members and liaise with colleagues;
  • Able to contribute to the work of the Core Steering Group and Network; and
  • Able to serve a term of two years.
Última actualización el Viernes 01 de Octubre de 2010 09:42
 

Network history

HIV/AIDS is a top priority for the International Council of Nurses and ICN has been instrumental in promoting prevention, care, treatment and sound policy to fight the epidemic. We continue to look into new ways of disseminating information to nurses around the world and to supporting linkages between different groups with a view to exchange of experiences and expertise. Given the constant need for information exchange the decision to form an HIV/AIDS Network was timely.

The ICN HIV/AIDS Network was launched at the 23rd ICN Quadrennial Congress in Taiwan, May 2005. Over 100 delegates attended the launch, most of which signed up to the network. The launch was presided over by an ICN Board member and  known HIV/AIDS nurse researcher, Dr. Bill Holzemer, Professor, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, USA.

The speakers at the launch were:

  • Steve Jamieson – Royal College of Nursing, UK
  • Tesfamicael Ghebrehiwet – ICN Representative
  • Patrick Robinson – President, American Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (ANAC), USA
  • Brenda Done – President, Canadian Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (CANAC), Canada
  • Dotty Dikwayo – Co-ordinator, SADAC Network of Nurses and Midwives in AIDS Care (SANNAM), South Africa
  • Ian Hodgson – Programme Adviser, Health and Development Networks, Thailand
  • June Webber – Director, International Policy and Development, Canadian Nurses Association (CNA), Canada

Nursing has formed both national and regional HIV/AIDS nursing associations. It is hoped such organisations will maintain strong linkages through the ICN HIV/AIDS Network. Such groups include the Association of American Nurses in AIDS Care (ANAC), The Canadian Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (CANAC), and the Southern African Development Community AIDS Network of Nurses and Midwives (SANNAM).

Another group, the European Association of Nurses in HIV/AIDS Care (EANAC) was set up in 1990 to provide a forum for HIV/AIDS nurses within the region. It was dissolved in 2004, as HIV/AIDS care has changed in many parts of Europe over the time of EANAC’s work. As part of closing EANAC, the remaining funds passed to ICN to support the ICN HIV/AIDS Network.
Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 10:21
 

Network Advisory Group

The Telenursing Network Advisory Group for 2013-2015 consists of 8 members representing nurses worldwide. The Group will work collaboratively with the ICN eHealth Programme staff.

Konstantinos Antypas, RN

PhD Research Fellow, MSc Health Informatics
Norwegian Centre for Integrated Care and Telemedicine
University Hospital of North Norway
P.O. Box 35
N-9038 Tromsø, Norway

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Isabelle Skinner, PhD, RN

Professor of Nursing
University of Tasmania

Department of Health and Human Services
PO Box 3513
Burnie Tasmania, Australia 7320

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Diane Castelli, RN, MS, MSN

Independent Telehealth/Telenursing Consultant
593 High Rock Road
Fitchburg, MA USA 01420

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Munawar Hussain, RN

P.O. Kot Nawab
Sanghar
Sindh
Pakistan 68000

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Jennifer Chipps,

BSC (Nurs) (Psychology)
Dip Nurs Ed Dip Nurs Admin MPH, PhD
School of Nursing and Public Health
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Durban
South Africa

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Jose Angel Sanguino

Director, Nacional Administrativo
Ubz Zapara Bloque 11 Apto 5 Prolongacion 2
Maracaibo
Zulia Venezuela 4002

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Kathleen Donaher, PhD, RN-BC
Associate Professor

Regis College
235 Wellesley St.
Weston, MA USA 02493-1571

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Angela Single

Clinical Director
BTGlobal Health
5 The Grove, St Neots
Cambridgeshire, PE19 5US  UK

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ICN Staff

Nicholas Hardiker, ICN Consultant

School of Nursing Midwifery & Social Work
MS1.12, Mary Seacole Building,
University of Salford, Salford  M5 4WT UK

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ICN Staff

Claudia Bartz, ICN Consultant

UWM College of Nursing
PO Box 413, Milwaukee WI USA
53201-0413

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Última actualización el Lunes 17 de Marzo de 2014 16:50
 

Liaison Role for Core Steering Group Members

Goal: Liaise and provide support to the designated Subgroup chair and Subgroup members.

  • Plan and schedule periodic communication activities about the projects of the Subgroup.
  • Facilitate activities and projects in collaboration with the Chair of the Subgroup(s).
  • Communicate status of the Subgroup periodically to Core Steering Group chair.
  • Meet with the Subgroup Chair and members during the annual meeting;
  • Provide a report of the Subgroup's activities related to their action plan to the Core Steering Group at the annual meeting;
  • Communicate with the Chair and Subgroup members regarding the work set out in the action plan;
  • Clarify the process to be used by the Subgroup Chair to facilitate problem solving;
  • Learn the areas of expertise and resources available to the Subgroup through its members;
  • Become a resource for the members of the Subgroup for the planned work and activities;
  • Educate oneself on topics addressed by the Subgroup from an international perspective; and
  • Act as a resource for the Subgroup Chair to facilitate problem solving.

Criteria for Liaison Representative

  • Member of the Core Steering Group;
  • Has had previous experience as coordinator, team leader, or officer in an organization/agency; and
  • Knowledge of mentoring process, ability and desire to assist colleagues in professional growth.
Última actualización el Jueves 19 de Agosto de 2010 15:37
 

Responsibilities of Core Steering Group

Chair

  • Preside at all meetings;
  • Explain and adjudicate questions of order;
  • Announce and conduct business;
  • Entertain one motion/resolution/item for discussion at a time;
  • Be fair and impartial;
  • Give signature when necessary;
  • Be ex-officio of all Subgroups;
  • Liaise with designated ICN staff consultant; and
  • Respond to, facilitate or refer all network inquiries.

Vice Chair

  • Review materials for publication and/or posting on website;
  • Represent the Student Network when Chairperson is not available;
  • Call the meeting to order in absence of the Chair; and
  • Inform candidates of being selected to serve on the Core Steering Group or Subgroup (s).

Secretary

  • Keep and disseminate minutes of meetings;
  • Record name of the member introducing a motion/issue;
  • Maintain Network archives;
  • Receive and archive reports from Chair; and
  • Maintain Student Network Bulletins.

Membership Team

  • Respond to the Student Network applicants interested in volunteer participation in the network;
  • Establish and follow process of providing data to Subgroup Chairs for filling vacancies in Core Steering Group and Subgroups;
  • Report progress of membership and Student Network volunteers at annual Core Steering Group meetings;
  • Review potential members for Student Network recruited by the Core Steering Group or Subgroups or interested others; and
  • Act as liason to subgroups as assigned by the Chair.
Última actualización el Jueves 19 de Agosto de 2010 15:29
 

Network History

The International Council of Nurses (ICN) acknowledges that telenurses using information and communication technologies (ICT) extend nursing’s reach and improve access to care. In telenursing, ICT ranges from the simple telephone to sophisticated voice and video interactive systems and can make care delivery more efficient and potentially more effective. ICN recognizes that telenursing represents a new age in healthcare delivery. By capitalizing on the power of technology and collaboration among health care professionals, telenursing is well positioned to address current and emerging health system challenges such as those related to aging populations and chronic illnesses; community and home based care; access problems related to geographical, social and financial circumstances; increasing costs and reduced funding; and nursing shortages.

ICN published a monograph, Telehealth and Telenursing: Nursing and Technology Advance Together, in 2000 and the International Professional Standards for Telenursing Programmes in 2001. Both were developed by Kathleen Milholland Hunter. Following an International Telenursing Role Survey in 36 countries and a thorough literature review, ICN published International Competencies for Telenursing in 2007, developed by Loretta Schlachta-Fairchild. Through these publications, telenursing was recognized as an important contributor to the ICN mission of advancing nursing and health worldwide.

ICN is pleased to support the work of telenurses, to promote opportunities for exchange of ideas and expertise, and to support the professional goal of integrating telenursing roles into global nursing practice.

Última actualización el Miércoles 11 de Agosto de 2010 08:33
 

Speeches / Papers

Última actualización el Viernes 20 de Agosto de 2010 15:36
 

Meeting of the ICN HIV/AIDS Network at the ICN Congress, Durban, South Africa

The ICN HIV/AIDS Network met during the ICN 24th Quadrennial Congress in Durban, South Africa, 27 June to 4 July 2009. This is the third meeting of the Network since its launch in 2005. About 300 participants with diverse HIV and AIDS expertise and interests attended the meeting. The session was chaired by Adele Webb, Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, USA:

Following an overview of the ICN HIV/AIDS Network’s aim, scope and membership by ICN, there were brief presentations and discussions on the following areas:

  • HIV transmission and prevention strategies in Mauritius:  Carmen Anazor, AIDS Unit, Ministry of Health and Quality of Life, Mauritius.
  • Regional networking activities and experiences of SANNAM: Philemon Ngomu, SANNAM, South Africa.
  • UK National HIV Nurses Association activities and experiences: Catrin Evans, University of Nottingham, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, Nottingham, U.K.
  • Coordinating workplace HIV services in Southern Africa: Nelouise Geyer, Public Services International, South Africa
  • ICAP Nurse Capacity Initiative:  A New Approach to Meeting Nursing Challenges in the Era of HIV: Jennifer Dohrn, Columbia University, School of Nursing, USA

The presentations were followed by open discussions on the presentations and also addressed the following questions:

  • How can the ICN HIV/AIDS Network add value to the work of nurses in AIDS care?
  • What are the HIV/AIDS issues and priorities in your country and what should ICN be advocating at the international level?
  • How could we stimulate involvement of Network members (e.g. Network Bulletin, website chat page)?

The participants stressed the importance of networking and exchanging of information and best practices to promote excellence in clinical practice, management, education and research related to HIV and AIDS.  The ICN HIV/AIDS Network was seen as a sustainable forum for regular exchange of current knowledge, experiences and best practices.

Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 10:25
 

Materials and Notes

Última actualización el Jueves 19 de Agosto de 2010 15:52
 

Health Information

Disclaimer
The International Council of Nurses takes no responsibility for the accuracy or appropriateness of information posted on any of the Web sites listed here in our Links section.
Última actualización el Viernes 01 de Octubre de 2010 09:46
 

Publications

Última actualización el Viernes 20 de Agosto de 2010 09:15
 

Overview

Nurses’ holistic view of their role and responsibility in the health care system and their knowledge, based on research and experience is invaluable to the evolution of any health care system. For this knowledge to affect the provision of health care it must reach the policy makers, and health policy must reflect the knowledge generated by research and experience. It therefore calls for nurses’ active participation in political action and policy development, either as policy makers themselves or in cooperation with policy makers.

Asta Moller

Why a Nurse Politician Network?

The following issues have been identified with regards to status of women and nurses politicians worldwide:

  • few women are actively involved today in politics whether appointed or elected at any level – provincial, national, regional. The Nordic countries have the highest number with female representing 40.8% of elected officials. The rest of Europe shows a rate of 17.45%, close to both Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia - with 16.6% and 16.4% respectively while, in the Arab states, the rate stands at 8.8%.
  • even fewer nurses are elected. For example, in Iceland and Norway which belong to the country group with the highest rate of women in politics, the nurse representation in the parliament is respectively 3.17%, and 2.95%.
  • nurse politicians, like nurses and women everywhere – often shoulder responsibilities of home, family and career. This means juggling personal, family and professional issues with those of their constituents and party.
  • Further pressure comes from the health care system and the profession, creating expectations that are sometimes unrealistic.
  • As women, nurses share same vulnerabilities to harassment. Moreover their jobs often take them away from families for long periods, creating separation and isolation.
  • As nurse politicians these women and men have valuable insights to share with each other, and with nursing more broadly.

For all these reasons, ICN established the NPN given the important role nurse politicians have to play in influencing health and social policy.

What is the purpose of the Network

The ICN Nurse Politician Network (NPN) is designed to serve as a forum for elected and appointed nurse politicians to communicate. As it, NPN is the international link for nurse politicians to exchange information and learn from each other. It can assist in the mentoring of new and/or aspiring nurse politicians.

ICN will beneficiate from the network which represents an access to skilled lobbyists and policymakers who can offer advice and help identify key current and future issues.

Última actualización el Lunes 18 de Octubre de 2010 16:19
 

Message from the Chair

Welcome to the ICN Nurse Politicians Network page! As Chair of the Network and a nurse politician, I am pleased to be part of this new initiative, one I believe will bring benefits to ICN and nurse politicians alike.

For many years, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) has had a strong interest in developing and strengthening the nursing influence in health policy. This includes encouraging nurses to take an active part in policy making and political decision-making processes.

The past few years have seen more nurses enter politics and today several serve as Ministers of State, members of parliament, and as provincial and state legislators as well as in positions in local government. I personally became involved in 1999 when I was asked by the Prime Minister of Iceland if I would be interested in running for a seat in Parliament. As things evolved I was elected a member of the Icelandic Parliament, Althingi, in May 1999. It continues to be a stimulating and satisfying experience, and there is no doubt that my preparation as a nurse and my experience as President of the Icelandic Nurses Association - and as an ICN Board member - have served me well.

The Network offers nurse politicians, often working in isolation, a vehicle to share knowledge and experience and exchange and test ideas. As well it provides new and experienced politicians with the opportunity to develop mentoring relationships.

The Network is primarily a safe place for nurse politicians to meet. Aside from this page, nurse politicians have access to a restricted space for information sharing and exchange.

In addition to being a vehicle of support to current politicians, the Network members are invited to:

  • Share their expertise in policy and advocacy with global nursing.
  • Assist ICN in identifying and monitoring political trends and issues affecting health care, nursing and society in general.
  • Serve as a political opinion resource to ICN.

I hope to meet many nurse colleagues through the Network and look forward to Network members sharing ideas and advice with the broader ICN membership.

With best wishes,

Asta Möller (Iceland), Chair of the Nurse Politicians Network

Última actualización el Lunes 18 de Octubre de 2010 16:28
 

Members of the Nurse Politicians Network Steering Group

Asta Moller, Chair of the Network

Asta Möller has contributed considerably to nursing and health care in Iceland as a nurse and politician. She served as president of the Icelandic Nurses Association between 1994 and 1999. She became involved in politics when she ran and won a seat in Parliament in May 1999. Since then she has sat on various committees and, since 2005, has chaired the Icelandic Delegation of the Inter-Parliamentary Union. Aste served as a Board member of ICN and subsequently as Second Vice-President.

Mo-Im Kim

Mo Im Kim, ICN Past President, is recognised internationally for her contribution as a practitioner, educator, politician and policy leader. She is considered the architect of Korea’s primary health care system. In 1981, she became the first nurse elected to the Korean parliament where she influenced national health policy and legislation. She also served as the Minister of Health and Welfare and was President of the Korean Women’s Political Caucus in 2003.

Laila Davoy

Laila Davoy, a former ICN Board member, has a long career in government and politics. She served as a State Secretary and Deputy Minister before becoming President of the Norwegian National Nurses Association. She served as an ICN Board Member 1997-1999 and in government was twice appointed Minister: Minister of Labour and Government Administration and Minister of Children and Family Policy. Since October 2005 she is an elected member of the Norwegian parliament.

Rowaida Al-Ma’aitah

Rowaida Al-Ma'aitah is a Senator in the Upper House of the Jordanian Parliament and also serves as a consultant on health and social development to HRH Princess Muna Al-Hussien and as a member of the international women parliamentarians steering committee on child protection. She formerly served as Minister of Social Development, Minster of Government Performance, and President of Hashemite University as well as Vice President and Secretary General of the National Council for Family Affairs.


There has never been a greater need for nurses to get involved in the political and and policy process. Nurses are needed to ensure that shrinking resources are best used for the health of the nation, to find ways to provide affordable access to health care for all and to promote the debate about the relationship between broad social factors and health

Rains, J. W., & Carroll, K. L. (2000). Journal of Nursing Education, Vol. 39, No.1 37-40.

Última actualización el Lunes 18 de Octubre de 2010 16:18
 

Membership

Membership is open ONLY to:

  • Nurses presently or previously elected or appointed at national, provincial/state and supranational levels.

Members need to have access to the internet and, presently, to be able communicate in English.

Membership benefits:

  • Opportunity to gain knowledge of political working worldwide.
  • Up-to-date knowledge on nursing and health trend and issues.
  • Support from colleagues in other countries.
  • Access to efficient lobbying on key issues.
  • Strategic links with other elected people.

 

I know from my own experience that if nurses do not accept the responsibility and enter the battle field to fight in favor of the social support systems that make the life of families and individuals better and benefits the whole society, others would eagerly and happily step in do so, sometimes for the worse.

Asta Möller

 

To become a member of the NPN, nurses elected or appointed at national and supranational levels you will need to fill in the membership form.

Última actualización el Martes 09 de Noviembre de 2010 14:54
 

Goals and Benefits

The principal goals of ICN's Telenursing Network are:

  1. to serve as a global resource for nurses working or interested in telenursing practice, technology development, policy, standards, education and research; 
  2. to promote effective networking and linkages, and 
  3. to enable the sharing of telenursing knowledge and expertise and stimulate reflection on the changing nature of nursing care delivery systems across the globe.

As an evolving and dynamic resource, the ICN Telenursing Network:

  • Provides a global forum for addressing issues related to telenursing/telehealth.
  • Promotes awareness of telenursing so that the roles and expertise of telenurses are understood, respected and optimized within the health care system.
  • Promotes telenursing as an accepted means for nurses to extend their reach to patients via the use of information and telecommunications technologies.
  • Assists with the development and sharing of knowledge, tools and guidelines which nurses can use to embed telenursing skills and competencies into their practice.
  • Promotes sound telenursing practice.
  • Examines how telenursing can serve as a nursing force multiplier, extending the reach of nurses to more patients and providing better access to care.
  • Establishes links between ICN’s Telenursing Network and those international organizations that promote and support the use of telehealth and advanced technologies for telenurses.
  • Provides opportunities for the exchange of knowledge and experience to develop the science and practice of telenursing.
  • Organizes meetings and conferences.
Última actualización el Jueves 18 de Abril de 2013 15:54
 

Aims and objectives

The key objective of the ICN HIV/AIDS Network is to be a global resource for nurses working in, or interested in, HIV policy, practice development, education and research. By promoting networking and linkages, the network will enable knowledge and expertise to be shared, while reflecting the changing nature of HIV client-care across the globe.

Network Coordinator

The ICN HIV/AIDS Network will have a Network Coordinator, who liaises closely with ICN and be responsible for the day-to-day management and smooth running of the Network.  The terms of reference of the Network Coordinator will be to:

  • Develop Network Bulletin that is issued twice a year
  • Maintain web site
  • Monitor chat room
  • Plan and organise forums of the Network during ICN conference and congress
  • Disseminate information on products and services of relevance to the Network
  • Respond to queries from members and others
  • Solicit input into the work and activities of the Network
  • Consult on issues and trends including ICN policy
Última actualización el Miércoles 29 de Septiembre de 2010 11:18
 

Aims and Objectives

As an evolving and dynamic resource, the ICN Rural and Remote Nursing Network:

  • Provides a global forum for identification and discussion of issues related to rural and remote nursing
  • Promotes awareness of rural and remote nursing so that the roles, contributions and expertise of rural and remote nurses are understood, respected and optimized within the health care system
  • Assists with the development and sharing of knowledge, tools and guidelines which rural and remote nurses can use to embed specialized skills and competencies into their practice
  • Promotes sound rural and remote nursing practice across the globe
  • Establishes links between the ICN Rural and Remote Nursing Network and other international organizations, resources and networks to promote the sharing and exchange of knowledge, expertise and experience

On July 2nd 2009 at the ICN congress in Durban, South Africa, members of the Rural and Remote Nursing Network's core steering group met with and listened to hundreds of nurses that expressed concerns related to rural and remote nursing. This meeting provided a wonderful opportunity for nurses across the globe to voice their concerns to the core steering group. The group took notes and spoke briefly about how they hope to make the network more active, increase communication venues, and increase list serve membership. The core steering group inform the ICN of problems that need to be addressed in rural and remote areas, ultimately providing the framework for some of ICN’s initiatives.

Última actualización el Miércoles 29 de Septiembre de 2010 11:16
   

Network Meeting 2009

On July 2nd 2009 at the ICN congress in Durban, South Africa, members of the Rural and Remote Nursing Network's core steering group met with and listened to hundreds of nurses that expressed concerns related to rural and remote nursing. This meeting provided a wonderful opportunity for nurses across the globe to voice their concerns to the core steering group. The group took notes and spoke briefly about how they hope to make the network more active, increase communication venues, and increase list serve membership. The core steering group inform the ICN of problems that need to be addressed in rural and remote areas, ultimately providing the framework for some of ICN’s initiatives.

Última actualización el Miércoles 21 de Agosto de 2013 01:00
 

Boletín electrónico Red de Enfermeras de zonas rurales

Última actualización el Martes 08 de Julio de 2014 01:00
 

Podcasts

Coming soon....
Última actualización el Lunes 14 de Junio de 2010 16:01
 

Conferences and Events

Coming soon ...
Última actualización el Lunes 14 de Junio de 2010 16:08
 

Links

Coming soon...
Última actualización el Lunes 14 de Junio de 2010 16:11
 

References/Protocols

The publication "The Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response" - available here.

 

Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 13:39
 

History of the Emergency Nurses Association in USA

In 1970, acknowledging the need for an organization that represented the interests of those nurses working in the emergency department, Anita Dorr, RN and Judith Kelleher, RN, MSN, founded what is known today as the Emergency Nurses Association.

Anita, working in Buffalo, New York and inventing the crash cart, formed the Emergency Room Nurses Organization while Judith and her colleagues in California had formed the Emergency Department Nurses Association. Each perceived a need for nurses involved in emergency healthcare to pool their resources in order to set standards and develop improved methods for effective emergency nursing practice. Their goal was to also provide continuing education programs for emergency nurses as well as provide a united voice for all nurses involved in emergency care.

The two groups formally joined forces on December 1, 1970, and the Association was incorporated as the Emergency Department Nurses Association (EDNA). The name was changed to the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) in 1985 to reflect the practice of emergency nursing as role-specific and not site-specific.

Originally aimed at teaching and networking, the organization has evolved into an authority, advocate, lobbyist, educator and voice for emergency nursing. In addition, in 1995, Emergency Nurses Care (ENCARE) became an affiliate as ENA's Injury Prevention Institute. The institute provides training to volunteers who do community outreach education programs on gun safety, underage alcohol use, drinking and driving, safety belts, bicycle helmet safety, and more to 300,000 people a year ranging in age from 8 years to adult.

ENA's Trauma Nursing Core Course and Emergency Pediatric course are taught to over 50,000 nurses a year both in the U.S. as well as abroad. The program has been translated in several languages and has been conducted internationally. In addition, ENA provides a Course in Advanced Trauma Nursing, Triage, and an Orientation program.

Today a variety of courses, publications, community outreach programs, government relations activities, research, continuing education programs and certification are offered by ENA to the more than 22,000 members and 4,000 injury prevention volunteers.

Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 12:43
 

About Student Network

Welcome to the International Council of Nurses Student Network! Full membership is open to individuals who are currently undertaking a program of education leading to initial qualification as a nurse in their country or who have qualified within the last two years.

The aim of the ICN Student Network is to:

Create an international network of individual nursing students that exists based upon the values of inclusiveness, diversity, equity, accountability and collegial communication which will serve to collaboratively advance the international nursing agenda in the interest of the public.

With the following specific objectives:

  • Provide a forum for nursing students throughout the world to discuss topics related to individual and community health, education and science and to formulate policies from such discussions;
  • Promote and facilitate professional and scientific exchanges and extracurricular training for nursing students;
  • Link nursing students and international health organizations and encourage co-operation between them for the ultimate benefit of society;
  • Recognize the international responsibility of nursing students to foster and advocate for a social justice agenda.

These are important and ambitious objectives and we will need your help in order meet them. We currently exploring new ways in which nursing students, at all levels of education, can participate in ICN Student Network and help this Network to meet these objectives.

This website serves as our primary communication tool and encourage you to check back often for updates and new information. The first thing you can do is to join the network by completing the student application form.

If you or any students you work with would like to become more involved with ICN or if you/they have any suggestions about how ICN Student Network can better serve its student members, please complete the Student Network Application form and feel free to contact us.

We thank you for your continued involvement in the ICN Student Network and look forward to hearing from you!

Última actualización el Miércoles 06 de Agosto de 2014 13:52
   

Introduction

The International Council of Nurses (ICN) International Student Nurse Network was established in 2007 to provide an international resource for current or future student nurses, newly graduated nursing students and others interested in student nursing issues such as educators, policy makers, regulators, and health planners.

The network provides an evolving forum for discussion, follows trends in the field, and disseminates relevant and timely information. The Core Steering Group provide the leadership and infrastructure necessary to facilitate the aims and objectives of the network. Members of these groups are student nurses committed to providing support for the presence, initiation and maintenance of students in initial nursing education programs globally.

The network uses an informal model of organization and functions in collaboration with, and under the umbrella of, the International Council of Nurses. This provides a strong global dimension as well as international co-ordination and support for the work of the network. ICN's policies and official positions on nursing and health related issues are the framework within which the Network functions. Representation from ICN is through a designated staff member liaison to the Core Steering Group.

These guidelines have been developed to inform members and potential members of the scope of service and opportunities for participation in the activities and business of the network.

Última actualización el Jueves 19 de Agosto de 2010 14:10
 

Objectives of the Student Network

  • Provide a forum for nursing students throughout the world to discuss topics related to individual and community health, education and science and to formulate policies from such discussions;
  • Promote and facilitate professional and scientific exchanges and extracurricular training for nursing students;
  • Link nursing students and international health organizations and encourage co-operation between them for the ultimate benefit of society;
  • Recognize the international responsibility of nursing students to foster and advocate for a social justice agenda
Última actualización el Jueves 19 de Agosto de 2010 14:12
 

Membership

Full membership is open to individuals who are currently undertaking a program of education leading to initial qualification as a nurse in their country or who have qualified within the last two years.

The process for becoming an ICN Student Nurse Network member is:

  • Complete the membership application available on the network website;
  • Indicate your areas of interest.

If you are interested and believe that you have the expertise to contribute as a member Core Steering Group and/or the Working Groups, please be sure to fill out the areas that you are prepared to contribute to on the application form.

Última actualización el Viernes 01 de Octubre de 2010 09:31
 

Meetings

Conferences or meetings are held regularly usually in conjunction with a larger ICN Conference.

The settings and dates can be found on the website.

General meetings of Core Steering Group are open to interested observers.

Última actualización el Miércoles 20 de Agosto de 2014 01:00
 

HIV-AIDS Network Membership Guidelines

Introduction
The ICN HIV/AIDS Network has recently been established to provide a resource for nurses working in, or interested in, HIV policy, practice, education and research. The network provides a forum to enable members to share knowledge and expertise. It will disseminate relevant information which reflects the changing and evolving experience of HIV infection worldwide. A Network Advisory Group is being set up to facilitate activities of the Network.

The network uses an informal model of organisation and functions under the umbrella of ICN. This provides a strong global dimension as well as international co-ordination and support. ICN’s policies and official positions on nursing and health related matters provide the framework for Network activity.

Membership guidelines
The HIV/AIDS Network is part of ICN’s coalition of networks that foster nursing globally through individual membership. Persons practicing in or interested in the field of HIV/AIDS care are invited to join in the development and advancement of the network goals.

Participation in the network is free at present and membership forms can be found here

Aims and objectives
The key objective of the ICN HIV/AIDS Network is to be an integrated resource for nurses working in or interested in HIV policy, practice development, education and research.

By promoting networking and linkages, the network will enable knowledge and expertise to be shared, while reflecting the changing nature of HIV client-care across the globe.

Structure
There is a  Network Coordinator and Network Advisory Group whose members facilitate the activities of the Network and who liaise with members throughout the World.

Última actualización el Viernes 01 de Octubre de 2010 08:55
   

Network Advisory Group

The ICN HIV/AIDS Network will be supported by an Advisory Group bringing together geographical balance and expertise. Members of the Advisory Group must be members of their national nurses association. The Advisory Group will work closely with the Coordinator of the Network. Functions of the Advisory Group include:

  • contribute to the Bulletin of the Network on trends and issues related to HIV/ADS
  • generate membership for the Network  in their area and other areas as possible
  • contribute to the agenda of forum meetings
  • assume delegated functions
  • monitor chat room and stimulate/moderate discussions
  • serve as ambassador of the Network

The term of office for the Advisory Group will be for an initial three years and renewable based on contribution and interest in the ICN Network.

The Advisory Group will maintain close collaboration with the Coordinator of the Network.

Última actualización el Martes 17 de Agosto de 2010 10:24
   

The ICN Observatory on Licensure and Registration

Purpose

The purpose of the Observatory on Licensure and Registration is to enable ICN and the nursing profession to anticipate and respond in a timely, appropriate manner to international regulatory developments by providing leadership in influencing policy on global regulatory matters.

Activities

The Observatory will:

  • Carry out regular trend scanning.
  • Analyse the impact of emerging regulatory policies/issues.
  • Identify priority issues related to licensure and registration, which should be addressed by ICN.
  • Assist ICN to develop sound policy related to licensure and registration.
  • Promote strategic thinking and research on regulation.
  • Promote collaborative action in the regulatory field.

Membership

The Observatory consists of a small, invited cross-sectional group established to provide ICN with advice on emerging and future trends in regulation, strategic initiatives to be undertaken and policy stances ICN should consider.

The first formal meeting of the Observatory took place November 2005 in Madrid, Spain. The key focus of this event was to inform future ICN work by describing a scenario for licensure and registration in 2015.

Reporting

The Observatory reports on an annual basis to the ICN Board and will provide the Council of National Representatives in 2009 with a full report.

Última actualización el Lunes 11 de Octubre de 2010 09:41
 

Why a Network ?

ICN uses the word regulation in a highly positive sense to refer to all of those legitimate and appropriate means--governmental, professional, private, and individual -- whereby order, consistency, identity and control are brought to the profession. The profession and its members are defined; the scope of practice is determined; standards of education and of ethical and competent practice are set; and systems of accountability are established through these means.

This broad approach to regulation touches on a wide range of areas important to: those directly involved in the regulatory functions, practising nurses, other health professionals, policy makers and the public. With the rapid internationalisation of the world and creation of trade blocks, regulation as it affects mobility of persons and services is being scrutinised by international groups such as the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the World Trade Organisation (WTO). 

Today the profession needs a global mechanism that will be a vehicle for continual exchange and rapid action when necessary. The regulation network being created by ICN to serve as a forumfor the exchange of ideas, experience and expertise in regulatory issues affecting the nursing profession. Interested nurses and others are able to communicate, pursue their common interests and create a vital resource bank for regulation.

Última actualización el Miércoles 30 de Marzo de 2011 15:09
 

What Will the Network Do?

The network will be a permanent continually updated mechanism and a resource that: 
  • identify trends,
  • offer special expertise,
  • disseminate ICN's and others' work in regulation, and
  • organise meetings at our regular congresses and conferences.

Communication to members is via a variety of ways - newsletters, meetings and conferences. As ICN develops its WEB site, communication via the Internet will become an important means for communication and interaction among network members.

Última actualización el Miércoles 30 de Marzo de 2011 15:17
 

The Credentialing Forum

Twelve associations currently actively involved in credentialing activities, or with well-advanced plans to become involved in this field, attended the first meeting of the Forum in December 2000. The Credentialing Forum aims to:

  • Serve as a vehicle for countries with dynamic credentialing programs to communicate, consult, and collaborate with one another on trends, problems, solutions, etc.;
  • Promote and enable nursing’s role at the forefront of healthcare and professional credentialing and quality assurance; and
  • Advise ICN on developments and needs in the field of regulation, credentialing, and quality assurance.
Última actualización el Viernes 08 de Octubre de 2010 15:34
 

ICN International Continuing Nursing Education Credits (ICNEC)

ICN will approve continuing education activities organised by ICN, or outside organisations, which are deemed suitable for furthering learning and enhancing professional competencies. Thus, the system targets continuing education providers. Continuing education activities may be offered locally, regionally, nationally or internationally. Such approved activities will permit participants to receive ICNECs.
Última actualización el Viernes 08 de Octubre de 2010 15:35
 

Publications Related to Regulation

Regulation Bulletin
News for Regulators

Regulation

ICN on Regulation - Towards 21st Century Models
ICN Code of Ethics for Nurses
Reducing the Gap and Improving the Interface between Education and Service: A Framework for analysis and solution generation International
Regulation 2020: Exploration of the Present; Vision for the Future
The Role and Identity of the Regulator: An International Comparative Study
The Role and Identity of the Regulator - An International Comparative Study

Guideline

An Approval System for Schools of Nursing - Guidelines
Guidelines for Assessing Distance Learning Programmes

Monographs

Implementing Nurse Prescribing

Standards and competencies

ICN Framework and Core Competencies for the Family Nurse


Última actualización el Viernes 08 de Octubre de 2010 16:01
 

Why a research network?

ICN is committed to supporting nursing research as a powerful tool for generating new knowledge and evidence to underpin nursing practice. Nursing has an obligation to society to provide care that is continually researched and evaluated. Nurses working singly or in multidisciplinary research teams can offer new insights and unique perspectives to the research process.

Nursing research provides opportunities for linkages between those involved in the research process, practising nurses, other health professionals, policy makers and the public. With the rapid advances in knowledge and technology, nursing research serves as a framework for organising facts and evidence into a coherent and usable format.

A research network provides a vehicle for continual exchange of knowledge and experience. The ICN Research Network will serve as a forum for exchange of ideas, experience and expertise and as a vital resource bank for global nursing and health research.

Última actualización el Jueves 13 de Marzo de 2014 14:17
 

What Will the Network Do?

The network will be an evolving and continually updated forum and a resource that will:

  • identify trends in nursing/health research, 
  • provide opportunities for exchange of research knowledge and experience, 
  • promote ICN's and others' work in research, and 
  • organise meetings and conferences.

Communication will be in a variety of ways: network bulletin, meetings and conferences. ICN's WEB site will facilitate communication among network members and others.

Última actualización el Jueves 21 de Octubre de 2010 14:48
 

Nursing Research: A Tool For Action

The quest for quality care and evidence based practice has brought nursing research into the forefront. ICN has prepared this poster as a tool to increase visibility of nursing research and to stimulate nurses to use the scientific approach to gain new knowledge and to find answers to questions related to health illness and care delivery systems. We hope that you will use the poster to promote discussions on nursing research and as a tool to stimulate you into nursing research.

Nursing Research: A Tool For Action - Poster

The ICN Research Network was launched during the Centennial in June 1999 and it held its second meeting at the ICN Congress in Copenhagen 10-15 June 2001.

Última actualización el Jueves 21 de Octubre de 2010 15:21
 

Meeting of ICN Research Network at the ICN Congress, Durban, South Africa, July 2009

The ICN Research Network met during the ICN Quadrennial Congress in Durban, July 2009. This is the sixth meeting of the Research Network since its establishment in 1999. About 350 participants with diverse research expertise and interests attended the meeting. The session was chaired by Linda Van Blerk, South Africa.

Highlights of the discussions
Following an overview of the ICN Research Network, its aim, scope and membership, there were brief presentations and discussions on the following areas:

  • Hand hygiene to address infection rates including MRSA, Claire Kilpatrick, WHO, Geneva.
  • ARSI experiences and activities in promoting research, Anne Marrie-Mottaz, France.
  • Impact of Infection control practices in a major hospital, Carlo Colombo, Switzerland.
  • Effectiveness of Male Circumcision in reducing HIV transmission in males, Peter Johnson, USA.

The presentations were followed by open discussions that highlighted:

  • How can the ICN Research Network add value to the work of nurses and nurse researchers?
  • What are the research priorities in your setting/county and what should ICN be advocating at international level?
  • How could we stimulate involvement of Network members in the activities of the Bulletin?

The participants stressed the importance of research capacity building, particularly in developing countries and ways of integrating research into nursing curricula.

Última actualización el Jueves 21 de Octubre de 2010 15:24
 

Core Steering Group

Debra Cerasa, co-chair
Australia

Barbara Shellian, co-chair
Canada

Deborah Adebayo
United Kingdom

Marianne Baernholdt
United States of America

Leanne Hutt
New Zealand

Bernadette Luan
Indonesia

Pamela Petrucka
Canada

Lise Hounsgaard
Denmark
 
Lunic Base Khoza
South Africa

Jean Barry
ICN Consultant, Nursing and Health Policy

Última actualización el Jueves 10 de Abril de 2014 15:41
 

Professional Resources

  • Disturbing or facilitating? - On the Usability of Swedish eHealth 2013

On behalf of the Swedish Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, five organisations including Vårdförbundet - the Swedish Association of Health Professionals have analysed the usability of current eHealth systems from the perspective of healthcare and social service professionals. The resulting report titled "Disturbing or facilitating? - On the Usability of Swedish eHealth 2013” can be used as a knowledge base and a guide in work aiming at improving existing eHealth systems as well as in procurement and development of new eHealth systems in health and social care. The full report in Swedish can be downloaded at www.storandeellerstodjande.se.

Summary of the report:
http://www.swenurse.se/Global/Publikationer/e-halsa/Usability_of_eHealth.pdf

  • Telehealth in the Developing World

Richard Wootton, Nivritti G Patil, Richard E Scott, and Kendall Ho (Editors), Co-published by the Royal Society of Medicine Press LTD & International Development Research Centre, 2009.
The book, which is also available online (see URL below), has 28 chapters covering Policy, Education, and Clinical issues and examples about telehealth worldwide. Chapter 2, "Bridging the digital divide: Linking health and ICT policy", gives a very clear overview of this topic. Countries discussed in other chapters include Philippines, Brazil, India, Cambodia, Italy, Neal, Ecuador, China, South Africa and sub-Saharan Africa, Pakistan and Chechnya.

http://idl-bnc.idrc.ca/dspace/bitstream/10625/37334/1/IDL-37334.pdf

  • American Telemedicine Association – Telehealth Nursing Fact Sheet

The purpose of developing the ATA Telehealth Nursing Fact Sheet is to educate and provide nurses and non nurse members detailed information about Who, What, Where and Why about Telehealth Nursing and for disseminating this information throughout the global nursing communities. The Fact Sheet was written in collaboration with 13 American and 2 Canadian nurses who are leaders in the use of telecommunication technologies in healthcare.

www.americantelemed.org/docs/default-document-library/fact_sheet_final.pdf?sfvrsn=2 

  • CRNNS – Telenursing Practice Guidelines

The College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia published the "Telenursing Practice Guidelines" in 2008.  The Guidelines define telenursing practice and describe various aspects of telenursing that are important for registered nurses to consider, such as scope of practice, competence, security, quality and standards. The document can also be accessed from the College at www.crnns.ca or you may email the College at Esta dirección electrónica esta protegida contra spambots. Es necesario activar Javascript para visualizarla .

www.crnns.ca/documents/TelenursingPractice2008.pdf

Última actualización el Miércoles 23 de Abril de 2014 16:19
 

Essential nursing competencies related to HIV and AIDS

For further information, please visit http://www.janacnet.org/

Última actualización el Martes 19 de Julio de 2011 13:42
   

Meeting of the ICN HIV/AIDS Network at the ICN Conference, Malta

The ICN HIV/AIDS Network met during the ICN Conference in Malta, 4-7 May 2011. This is the fourth meeting of the Network since its launch in 2005. Participants with diverse HIV and AIDS expertise and interests attended the meeting. The session was chaired by Tesfa Ghebrehiwet, ICN Consultant, Nursing and Health Policy.

Following an overview of the ICN HIV/AIDS Network's aim, scope and membership and recent activities, there were brief presentations and discussions on the following areas:

  • Nurse capacity initiative in HIV/AIDS: Jennifer Dohrn, ICAP/INCI, Columbia University.
  • PMTCT of HIV infections: Carmen Anazor, AIDS Unit, Ministry of Health and Quality of Life, Mauritius.
  • National and international networking activities and experiences of ANAC: Adele Webb, ANAC, USA.
  • Regional networking activities and experiences of SANNAM: Nyangi Philemon Ngomu, SANNAM, South Africa.

The presentations were followed by open discussions addressing the following questions:

  • How can the ICN HIV/AIDS Network add value to the work of nurses in AIDS care?
  • What are the HIV/AIDS issues and priorities in your country and what should ICN be advocating at the international level?
  • How could we stimulate involvement of Network members (e.g. Network Bulletin, website chat page)?

The participants highlighted the importance of networking and exchanging of information and best practices to promote excellence in clinical practice, related to HIV and AIDS.

Última actualización el Martes 19 de Julio de 2011 14:01
 

Network Meeting 2013

International Council of Nurses 25th Quadrennial Congress

Melbourne, Australia

“Equity and Access to Health Care”

Report of ICN Rural and Remote Network meeting May 20, 2013

The 25th Quadrennial Congress of ICN was held in Melbourne, Australia in May 2013 and the program of the Congress was very varied and informative and was centred on the theme “Equity and Access to Health Care”. The information about the Congress, speaker’s presentations, abstracts and listing of posters is all available on the ICN website at www.icn.ch. Plenary speakers of note included Michel Kazatchkine – the United Nations Special Envoy for HIV/AIDS  - focusing on the access issues for HIV/AIDS in and Leslie Mancuso – President of Jhpiego – offering a stirring presentation on “Holding Up Half the Sky – a perspective on the role of women in the provision of health care. 

The Quadrennial Congress is another opportunity for a regular networking session for the ICN Rural and Remote Nursing Network. This meeting was held on May 20, 2013. There were over 100 nurses in attendance and the session consisted of presentations from two dynamic guest speakers (Marianne Baernholdt from USA and Christopher Cliffe from Australia) providing presentations on Rural Residency Programs for nurses and CRANAplus – a support centre for rural and remote nurses. The learning objectives for the session in Melbourne included:RRN meeting 2013a

  • Understand key issues related to the role of nurses working in rural and remote areas
  • Gain insights to mechanisms being put in place to support nurses working in rural and remote settings.
  • Identify way of contributing to the work of the Network.

 An update on the work of the Network was also included in the session.  The interest in the network was very encouraging and similarities of the work of nurses in rural and remote areas across the world was astonishing. One example was the opportunity to hear of the challenges of Australian nurses providing care to indigenous people in the remote outback was strikingly similar to the work of Canadian nurses in the First Nations and Inuit communities in northern Canada. Conversations that occurred in the Open Forum during the Network meeting included:

  • Educational opportunities of nurses in rural and remote nursing
  • Request for an easily organized way to access resources on the ICN webpage
  • Telehealth linkages for rural and remote nurses
  • Connections for researchers who are focusing in the area of rural and remote areas
  • Support for students who choose rural and remote as an area for clinical practice

The ICN Congress is an opportunity to contemplate the contribution of each of us in the global community of nursing and realize that nursing is important work – not just in our community or country but in places near and far. The next ICN Conference will be in 2015 in Seoul, South Korea and the next Congress will be in Barcelona Spain in 2017– there will be rural and remote network sessions at each of these meetings so start making your plans!

RRN meeting 2013b

Última actualización el Martes 15 de Octubre de 2013 13:49
 

LFC Membership

Última actualización el Miércoles 13 de Abril de 2011 15:32